“Everyone’s feeling it.”

You’ll hear that comment daily about our fledgling U.S. economy. It’s a psychological defense against the fear of an uncertain future. Assuring yourself that you’re not alone. The discussion then trails into heartbreaking scenarios of friends, and friends of friends who have it worse than the storyteller.

Countless tales of nurses and firemen whose overtime hours were a standard of their budgets, now have to fight for every hour of it. Then onto the layoffs and foreclosures. Lots of headshaking and ultimately the big question, “Whose gonna fix it? None of these clowns running the government.”

What I’ve yet to hear anyone say when about the economy dragon is, “Here’s my plan to beat it.”

Inevitably, that moment comes just before some drastic realization like, “We may have to give up cable!”

“No, no, no… there’s got to be some way to earn more money…”

There are lot’s of ways to earn more money. Problem is, people tend to look at how they can do more of what they were already getting paid for. It’s a natural instinct. If you own a lawn service, you want more yards to mow. That’s what pays the bills.

But, in “times like this” the real challenge of any struggling business owner is raising their awareness about new and different ways to offer their skills, services, and knowledge.

The first instinct is often to lower prices. They figure, I’d rather make half of what I used to rather than nothing at all. That’s understandable. It’s also very dangerous to the future of your business.

Tell people “pay me what you can,” and you’re guaranteed to get handed just about half that amount.

There’s better ways. Most of them just a click away. But, the first step is opening your mind. You don’t have to work twice as hard just to earn half as much. You just have to be ready to learn, and then ask one golden question, “Who will pay for what I know?”