I just got back from Nashville where I hung out with my friends Rob and Kira and their gang at TCC. 

Fine group of humans – much fun was had.

I love meeting freelancers.

No matter which Phase they are in, hearing their stories about what led them out of the “norm” and into this bold adventure of independence really lights me up. 

It’s easy for us to forget how rare and f’ing brave it is to go it alone in the working world.

Overcoming all the social, physical, and mental hurdles of doubt and resistance to reach ESCAPE VELOCITY and create your own thing.

Tenacious choice.

Because it IS a choice.

Most people would never make it. 

You did.

Soak that up and taste it for a second.

Pretty good, right?

Now…

There’s an important part of the job of creating your own job that I see a lot of freelancers screwing up – and it’s never more painful than face-to-face.

It’s the “describing what you do” part. 

Now, look. 

I get it…

Talking about your own biz is “the hardest thing” and you don’t want to come off all fake and “calculated” and “elevator pitches” are so lame, vvvvrt, fling, piyow!

Let that shit go.

If done correctly, the little formula I’m about to give you will get you past all that.

Plus, even if you did come off a little stilted delivering this, it’s better than stammering and looking down at your shoes when someone asks you one of the most important questions you can be asked as a business owner…

“So, what do you do?”

Think about how hard you’ve worked to be able to answer that question with confidence. 

Foregoing security and stability and paid time off, so you could walk your own path through the glorious forest of life…

And you fall apart at THIS question? 

“Well, it’s complicated… I’m mostly a copywriter, but I don’t want to be just a copywriter… I’m also interested in quantum physics so I could potentially move in that direction, but there’s like no real entrepreneurial path into that, and I’m not that into formal education constructs, so I….”

Torture.

Listen… if you’re having an existential crisis, do it in private, with friends and family.

Not standing on the rooftop of a conference hotel with your colleagues. 

I’m not saying you shouldn’t be honest but read the room. 

Being outwardly conflicted is of no use to you in these situations where people are only going to remember a tiny fraction of the people they meet. 

And the ones they DO remember could become clients, partners, allies, referral buddies. 

And yes, potentially lifelong friends.

But, what kind of friends? 

Be honest, is bonding over the fact that you don’t know what you’re doing the best way to connect at a time like that? 

Do you want to leave there with the phone numbers of three other people who have one foot out of the life you’re pursuing?  

Or is it better to stuff that confusion and insecurity into the hotel safe for a few hours while you go make friends with people who are creating momentum?

You invested a lot of time, energy, and moola to be there. 

You deserve a payoff. 

It’s measured in forwarding motion.

OK, relief time…

There’s a way to describe what you do in a way that cuts through the noise of sameness, gets across your passion, and can be easily amended to fit any situation… 

… from a bio to give a podcast host, to right after the first “cheers” on a hotel rooftop.

I call it the Rebel Yell. 

Go get it (on me).

More, more, more!


Speaking of face-to-face meetups… if you’re in London, England this Sunday, I’d love to meet you. I’m hosting a one-day-only copywriting mastermind and a private cocktail party on April 10th. As of this writing, there are a couple of seats open. If you’re interested, go to copychief.com/london. I’d love to meet you there.